Starting at:

$24.95 You save: $3.00 (11%)

List : $27.95

Product Highlights:

  • Enamelled Steel
  • With Coffee Pot & Lid
  • For Heating Liquids
  • Percolator included
GSI Outdoors : Picture 1 regular $24.95

About GSI Outdoors Enamelware Coffee Percolator

GSI Outdoors Enamelware Coffee Percolator Blue
The GSI Outdoors Enamelware Coffee Percolator Blue is the smart kitchenware for the smart people. The pot is made for heating liquids and percolating coffee. It is made of premium quality enameled steel that makes the product durable and stylish yet the pot weights so light. The shape of the pot and textured paint gives the pot a nice classy look. The pot comes with a lid that maintains the temperature for a longer period and keeps the liquid hot. The plastic holder placed on top of the lid keeps your hands safe against any kind of heat prone accidents. The pot would look great on any dining table, kitchen shelf or office desk. So stop thinking and grab now the GSI Outdoors Enamelware Coffee Percolator Blue.

GSI Outdoors Enamelware Coffee Percolator Features

  • Enamelled Steel
  • With Coffee Pot and Lid
  • For Heating Liquids
  • Percolator included

GSI Outdoors Enamelware Coffee Percolator Specifications

Sizes
8 Cup, 12 Cup
Weight
8 Cup: 1.33lbs, 12 Cup: 1.64lbs
Dimension Length
8 Cup: 8", 12 Cup: 8.7"
Width
8 Cup: 5.9", 12 Cup: 7"
Height
8 Cup: 9", 12 Cup: 10.20"
Material
Enameled Steel
Available in the Following Colors:
Blue, Green, Red
Available in the Following Sizes:
12 Cup, 8 Cup
Weight [with packaging]
12 Cup: 1.6 lb,
8 Cup: 1.75 lb
Mfr #
SKU
GSIECPR

Enamelware Coffee Percolator Customer Reviews

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GSI Outdoors Enamelware Coffee Percolator - Blue
 
3.5

(based on 2 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

Reviewed by 2 customers

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2.0

Not the best

By KB

from Spokane

About Me Casual/ Recreational

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Lightweight

Cons

  • Difficult to Use
  • Hard to Clean
  • Not Durable

Best Uses

  • Backyard
  • Day Trips

Comments about GSI Outdoors Enamelware Coffee Percolator - Blue:

No fill line, clear plastic top keeps coming off, lid comes off during cleaning. Not the best quality.

  • What Is Your Gear Style:
  • Minimalist
  • Was this a gift?:
  • No

Comment on this review

 
5.0

Just what I needed!!

By Camp Swampy Capt.

from Corning, NY

About Me Casual/ Recreational

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Durable
  • Easy To Set Up
  • Easy to Use
  • Good Design
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • None

Best Uses

  • Backcountry

Comments about GSI Outdoors Enamelware Coffee Percolator - Blue:

Great for camping...8 cups is plenty..

  • What Is Your Gear Style:
  • Minimalist
  • Was this a gift?:
  • No

Comment on this review

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Q&A

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Questions about this item:

Shopper  Why Did You Choose This?
STEVEN H  It had the right combination of features---a sight bulb, a handle, a wide mouth spigot---and price. I needed a coffee maker that didn't use electrical power, and this fits that ticket.
Shopper  I am trying to figured out which is better the all metal percolator or the enamel percolator and I will be using on the gas stove. Also I am concern about metal taste if I use the one all metal. Any one have answer for this? I have heard that the all metal one is easier to clean and have replacement for the plastic holder on the lid. I am thinking of going with the all metal. I am also concern about chemicals that can do harm over time. I am not sure which one is safer.
STEVEN H  I have used enameled coffee pots from forever---as a Boy Scout in my teens 40 years ago---as well as "all metal" and "Pyrex"-type glass ones. I prefer the enameled pot. It heats evenly, it cleans as easily as the glass types, has better heat characteristics than the metal ones, and it looks nicer---especially if as the years build up! The bubble piece on the top is not a "holder", it is a means for viewing the coffee's progress---as it gets darker, it gets closer to being ready. Plus if one likes stronger coffee, one can wait for the colour to darken without risking the "burned coffee" taste. But it is HOT, so don't touch it. I have an old glass one that I still use---I just fit it into the new pot. Also, the brewing basket and stem in this pot are not very well-made, although my experience is that this is true of all old-style brewing pots now days, regardless of their composition. You might browse Goodwill or an antique store/yard sales/estate sales and see if you can get a stronger, better-made basket and stem. I recommend using standard 4 or 8 cup brown paper filters and just cutting away the edges (keep the nice round bottom bit), but with the stock basket, you risk overflow due to the poor quality of manufacture in the drain holes. It works, it's rugged, and it's reasonably-priced.
Shopper  I am trying to figured out which is better the all metal percolator or the enamel percolator and I will be using on the gas stove. Also I am concern about metal taste if I use the one all metal. Any one have answer for this? I have heard that the all metal one is easier to clean and have replacement for the plastic holder on the lid. I am thinking of going with the all metal. I am also concern about chemicals that can do harm over time. I am not sure which one is safer.
STEVEN H  I have used enameled coffee pots from forever---as a Boy Scout in my teens 40 years ago---as well as "all metal" and "Pyrex"-type glass ones. I prefer the enameled pot. It heats evenly, it cleans as easily as the glass types, has better heat characteristics than the metal ones, and it looks nicer---especially if as the years build up! The bubble piece on the top is not a "holder", it is a means for viewing the coffee's progress---as it gets darker, it gets closer to being ready. Plus if one likes stronger coffee, one can wait for the colour to darken without risking the "burned coffee" taste. But it is HOT, so don't touch it. I have an old glass one that I still use---I just fit it into the new pot. Also, the brewing basket and stem in this pot are not very well-made, although my experience is that this is true of all old-style brewing pots now days, regardless of their composition. You might browse Goodwill or an antique store/yard sales/estate sales and see if you can get a stronger, better-made basket and stem. I recommend using standard 4 or 8 cup brown paper filters and just cutting away the edges (keep the nice round bottom bit), but with the stock basket, you risk overflow due to the poor quality of manufacture in the drain holes. It works, it's rugged, and it's reasonably-priced.
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